Is Your Heat Exchanger Really Cracked?

When homeowners hear that their heat exchanger may be damaged, there are a number of very valid questions that run through their minds. In this post, we attempt to answer those questions for you. What causes my heat exchanger to crack? A crack in your heat exchanger can be caused by any number of the following things: Stress on the system from heating your home non-stop. Pressure over time on weak spots in the heat exchanger including, but not limited to welds, bends, and rivets. Overheating due to a lack of airflow in and around the furnace. More often than not, this lack of airflow is caused by a dirty air filter. The use of weaker materials like aluminum and various steel alloys during the manufacturing process. Because heat exchangers undergo so much stress, they really should only be made out of stainless steel. Can I troubleshoot a cracked heat exchanger myself? In all honestly, the answer to this question is not really. That’s because heat exchanger coils have so much surface area. Additionally, it can be hard to get down into the little nook where heat exchangers live to see if there’s a crack anywhere. Your best bet is to call a heating repair technician you can trust at 702.227.5622 to troubleshoot the issue for you. He or she will run the necessary tests to confirm that you are in fact dealing with a cracked heat exchanger and will walk you through the steps to repair the issue quickly and...

What is a Heat Exchanger?

During your last HVAC inspection, there’s a good chance the technician said something about your heat exchanger. Whether he/she suggested a replacement or reported that everything was fine, it’s a critical component to the functioning of your heater so you should have at least a basic understanding of what the part is. Heat Exchanger 101 The heat exchanger is the part of your furnace that’s responsible for holding the flame. This part is also the part that saves your life by getting rid of things like carbon monoxide and caustic condensation. Since the heat exchanger is the part of the furnace that holds the flame and circulates heat into your home, many heating repair professionals consider it the heart of the furnace. That’s why it is so important to stay on top of the maintenance of this part. If the heat exchanger breaks or cracks, your furnace will be unable to produce heat. If your home is equipped with a high efficiency furnace, then you likely are dealing with a set up that contains two heat exchangers. There is a primary one that does most of the work and a secondary one that serves as back up. That secondary exchanger is the one that usually cracks because it holds a larger amount of condensation than the first. Unfortunately, it’s hard to tell if something is wrong with the heat exchanger (besides there being a lack of heat in your home). If you think something may be wrong with this crucial part, contact an HVAC pro by calling 702.227.5622...

Repairing Freon Leaks

This week we shared some information regarding freon (the compound that cools the air in your air conditioning unit). We covered some of the most common myths about freon leaks and exposed a few truths on what causes freon leaks. Now that you know the truth about the frustrating problem of freon leaks, here are some suggestions on how to repair them from a reputable HVAC company you can trust. Tips to Repair Freon Leaks #1 | Install Aluminum Evaporator Coils A great way to beat freon leaks is to have a heating and air conditioning repair company install aluminum coils into your unit. This is because, over the past few years, it’s been proven that aluminum is highly resistant to the corrosion that causes freon leaks in the first place. No corrosion = no leaks! #2 | Weld Pinholes You can also have a technician locate the leaks and weld them shut. If your budget is tight, this is an okay option for now. Unfortunately, this temporary solution usually ends in leaks resurfacing only worse and you end up spending more money in the long run. The best way to repair current leaks and prevent future leaks is to schedule an HVAC inspection with JMAC Heating & Air at 702.227.5622. The pros here will be able to pinpoint the cause of your leak and offer you the best solution for fixing...

Causes of Freon Leaks

Yesterday we gave you a brief introduction to freon leaks. We busted a common myth (stating that the freon stores in your system are constantly being depleted and need to be refilled) and gave you a few facts to help you the next time you’re dealing with a less-than-honest HVAC technician. To build on that, here is a quick guide that explains the three most common causes of freon leaks. At the end of this post, you’ll find a link to an article that shows you exactly how you can repair the leaks you find. Freon leaks can be caused by… … Bad parts. Unfortunately, shoddy manufacturing is the most common cause of freon leaks. Manufacturers are cutting corners in production and are creating parts that aren’t as sound as they should be in order to turn a profit during a recovering economy. This is leading to the development of freon leaks early in the life of an air conditioner. … Bad connections. Even when using the best parts, seemingly minor mistakes during installation can cause leaks. Most often, freon leaks are caused by weak solder connections. Thankfully, a skilled technician can fix this with relative ease. … Damage. Damage to any part of your air conditioning unit can cause freon to begin leaking. Most often, the damage happens to the part of your unit that’s outside. Weed whackers and lawnmowers are the most common culprits because they bang up the copper pipes that transport the freon. Think you’re dealing with a freon leak? Find out how you can repair a freon leak by calling JMAC Heating & Air...

Freon Leaks: Fact or Fiction?

Many people are told that freon slowly gets used up by the air conditioning system in their homes. These unsuspecting customers are told that their freon levels have been depleted and need to be replenished, usually with a lovely sticker price for the service. However, this just isn’t true. Freon doesn’t get consumed by your air-conditioner the way a car consumes gas. If the freon levels in your air conditioner are low, it’s because there’s a physical leak in the system that the compound is escaping through. Freon Leaks 101 Fact #1: Freon doesn’t have to be topped off every year. The compound changes it’s state from liquid to gas to liquid through the system, but energy is never used to consume it. If your current service technician is charging you for a regular freon refill, there’s a real leak that needs to be addressed. Fact #2: Freon leaks start small and get worse over time if the hole it’s escaping though is not fixed. This is the only reason why you would need to top off your freon. Fact #3: Freon gas is what usually leaks through the evaporator coil. Liquid freon leaks can happen, but they’re very rare and difficult to diagnose and fix. If you’re told you have a liquid freon leak, make sure to contact an experienced HVAC technician at 702.227.5622 to get a second opinion before you shell out any cash. Truthfully, this post only scratches the surface about freon leaks. Check out our post on the causes of freon leaks and how you can repair...